T2A Model for Change

T2A uses research and good practice to strengthen its proposal that developmental maturity is more helpful than chronological age in deciding on the best response to young adults (18-25) involved in the CJS.

How do we do this?

  • With funding and other resources from Barrow Cadbury Trust
  • Through the expertise of Alliance members
  • Learning from the partners we fund
  • Taking advice from criminal justice professionals
  • With input from those with lived experience.
Maintaining momentum

T2A Milestones

The T2A campaign has driven change for more than a decade, working with our partners, criminal justice professionals, and statutory services to do things differently.  There have been a number of significant achievements:

T2A Ongoing Work

T2A Outputs

T2A works with partners and stakeholders producing research, supporting and integrating young adult voices, developing policy ideas and propositions, disseminating evidence, influencing politicians, policy makers and professional bodies, supporting and providing guidance for criminal justice professionals, and responding to consultations.

What changes do we want to see?

  • Guidance is translated into practice across statutory services.
  • Policy makers understand that young adulthood is a distinct stage needing a tailored response
  • More voluntary community and social enterprise providers take a T2A approach
  • Statutory and professional guidance recognises the distinct needs of young adults

Ultimately T2A wants to minimise the number of young adults in the criminal justice system, and particularly in custody, and see better justice outcomes for young adults as well as reduced offending and re-offending for the wider community.

Latest news

9 April 2024
“Polluted the entire bloodline” – A spotlight on the experiences of young Muslim women in the criminal justice system
26 March 2024
“There’s a level of ignorance, a not wanting to understand” – Raising Awareness of Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)
26 March 2024
Better outcomes for children and young people with an Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)